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Faculty of Science

News and Events for
UBC Science Alumni | Issue 5, 2017

Teaching KITT to drive in the rain

Ever wonder why KITT, David Hasselhoff’s high-tech car in Knight Rider, never drove in the rain? Self-driving cars are getting closer to reality, but wet conditions are a major hurdle. UBC computer scientists are tackling that very Vancouvery problem.

Read story | Watch video

Can we chew through the jellyfish invasion?

Zoologist Lucas Brotz explains why increasing jellyfish blooms are a real problem. Even though jellyfish are consumed by humans, only a few species are meaty enough for the dinner table.

A UBC Science magazine by any name

We’re launching a new online publication with a more magazine-like experience, including guest bloggers. But we need a name! Help us pick one and you could win a $50 gift card for the UBC bookstore or a major retailer.


Ships, Satellites and Social Media

UBC oceanographer Philippe Tortell discusses the tools we can use to understand Arctic climate change.
November 25

Saturday Morning Physics

It’s not too late to attend TRIUMF’s Frontiers of Modern Physics lectures, taking place in Vancouver and Surrey. 
November 18, December 2

Faraday Show: The Physics of Winter

UBC's yearly science showcase for children is back, this time focusing on a very timely topic: winter. Bundle up.
December 10

Protecting SpongeBob’s home may be up to the snails

UBC researchers believe limpets, such as mussels, starfish and snails, can create a buffer against climate change. Mini-marine ecosystems featuring more of these creatures coped better with temperature variations.

Photo gallery: a closer look at limpets

UBC zoologists installed mini-ecosystems on the shore of Ruckle Provincial Park. You can see the tiny creatures that live in intertidal zones.


Make a world of difference to a science student

UBC Science is looking for alumni from all degrees to participate in roundtables, keynotes or career fairs. A day of your time can make a world of difference to a science student planning their future.

Mineral might have triggered Earth’s oxidation

How did Earth’s atmosphere fill with oxygen? UBC researcher Matthijs Smit believes a mineral called olivine was the trigger mechanism which allowed oxygen to accumulate 2.4 billion years ago.

  • The Canada Foundation for Innovation has provided $10 million in new research infrastructure funding for 15 UBC Science projects.
  • US News and World Report has ranked UBC as the top university in Canada for CS, Environment and Ecology, Mathematics and Plant and Animal Science.
  • UBC fisheries researcher Daniel Pauly has been awarded the 2017 Sir John William Dawson Medal.
  • Astronomer Ingrid Stairs has received the Rutherford Memorial Medal in Physics.
  • Fisheries expert Rashid Sumaila has been awarded the 2017 Volvo Environment Prize.
Alumni helping to build science

Three UBC Science alumni are being recognized for their contributions with Alumni Builder Awards. Congratulations to biotech entrepreneur Ali Tehrani (PhD’04), public health researcher and science communicator Jennifer Gardy (BSc’00), and chemist and outreach organizer Angela Crane (PhD’14).

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